355 Civil Engineer Squadron

355th CES Patch

355th CES Patch

Staff Sgt. Carlo Mangoba, 355th Civil Engineer Squadron, tries to keep some of the dirt out new hole that the new pole will do in on July 26.  Sergeant Mangoba is and electrical journeyman for CES.  (US Air Force Photo By:  Senior Airman Jacqueline Romero)

Staff Sgt. Carlo Mangoba, 355th Civil Engineer Squadron, tries to keep some of the dirt out new hole that the new pole will do in on July 26. Sergeant Mangoba is and electrical journeyman for CES. (US Air Force Photo By: Senior Airman Jacqueline Romero)

Airman 1st Class Cody Stockman, 355th Engineer Squadron, checks an air conditioner for condensation on July 25.  Airman Stockman is an heating, ventiliation and air conditing apprentice for CES. (US Air Force Photo By:  Senior Airman Jacqueline Romero)

Airman 1st Class Cody Stockman, 355th Engineer Squadron, checks an air conditioner for condensation on July 25. Airman Stockman is an heating, ventiliation and air conditing apprentice for CES. (US Air Force Photo By: Senior Airman Jacqueline Romero)

Staff Sgt. Raymond Worley and Bill Long, 355th Civil Engineer Squadron, takes a part the electrical parts off of an old pole to be able to replace it with a new one on July 26.  Sergeant Worley is an electrical journeyman for CES and Mr. Long is an Electrician for CES.  (US Air Force Photo By: Senior Airman Jacqueline Romero)

Staff Sgt. Raymond Worley and Bill Long, 355th Civil Engineer Squadron, takes a part the electrical parts off of an old pole to be able to replace it with a new one on July 26. Sergeant Worley is an electrical journeyman for CES and Mr. Long is an Electrician for CES. (US Air Force Photo By: Senior Airman Jacqueline Romero)

Tech Sgt. David Gough, 355th Civil Engineer Squadron, digs out the bursting pipe to be able to fix the leak and stop the water from draining everywhere on July 25.  Sergeant Gough is a Utilities Craftsman for CES. (US Air Force Photo By: Senior Airman Jacqueline Romero)

Tech Sgt. David Gough, 355th Civil Engineer Squadron, digs out the bursting pipe to be able to fix the leak and stop the water from draining everywhere on July 25. Sergeant Gough is a Utilities Craftsman for CES. (US Air Force Photo By: Senior Airman Jacqueline Romero)

Jerry Brown, 355th Civil Engineer Squadron, works on building a closet for the new CES commander on July 25.  Mr. Brown is a Structural engineer for CES.  (US Air Force Photo By:  Senior Airman Jacqueline Romero)

Jerry Brown, 355th Civil Engineer Squadron, works on building a closet for the new CES commander on July 25. Mr. Brown is a Structural engineer for CES. (US Air Force Photo By: Senior Airman Jacqueline Romero)


Unit:
355th Civil Engineer Squadron

Slogan:
"Engineers...Lead the Way!"

Mission (Mission Statement):
An integrated team of professionals planning, building, sustaining, and protecting the base and its environment for the Davis-Monthan community while providing combat-ready, deployable forces.

Vision Statement:
Develop the Air Force's most capable combat engineer team, while developing, building, and sustaining the Davis-Monthan AFB community with a dedicated and mission-focused team of professionals.

Description:
Best in Air Force as the 2011 Air Force Outstanding Civil Engineer Unit, The Society of American Military Engineers Curtin Award Small Unit Category. Nearly 400 military and civilian engineers comprise the 355th Civil Engineer Squadron, commanded by Lt Col John E. Tryon. The squadron operates out of 21 different facilities across the installation. Their efforts day-in and day-out provide the 355th Fighter Wing and D-M teammates with a top-notch platform from which to train, operate and deploy. CE provides the Desert Lightning Team with "Best in AF" engineer support. Our emphasis is on training, fitness, safety, project execution, and space management/energy savings. 72% of our Airmen score Excellent in PT as compared to a DLT average of 31%.

Our energy management team was recognized as best in AF for 2011. A 14.5 MW photovoltaic array will be operational by the end of CY12 with an annual energy output of 31 million kWh -- enough to power 13,000 homes, and reduce the installation energy costs by over $500K annually.

The CES prides themselves on employing sound asset management principles that enable D-M members to successfully continue the base mission every day while simultaneously ensuring the base has the capacity to meet the needs of tomorrow's Air Force. The CES is responsible for many of the behind-the scenes base functions including maintenance of all facilities, properly functioning utilities, unaccompanied housing and environmental management. They also plan, program, and execute all construction on base to the tune of $50-$80 million annually. The most visible CES members are ready for any emergency at any given time. These include members of Fire and Emergency Services, Readiness and Emergency Management, and Explosive Ordnance Disposal.

CES also prepares and deploys Combat Ready Engineers who are leading the fight downrange and providing the Air Force with more than 20,000 deployed man-days at more than 30 sites across the globe. D-M's CES is responsible for destroying more than 1,000 IEDs and providing $75 million in construction projects in support of Overseas Contingency Operations.