Expeditionary kitchen training at D-M

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Austin Harder, 56th Force Support Squadron food service specialist, reassembles a Babington Airtronic burner during an expeditionary kitchen training at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Sept. 29, 2015. Harder, among other FSS Airmen, learned how to operate, repair, and maintain the burner during the training. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mya M. Crosby/Released)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Austin Harder, 56th Force Support Squadron food service specialist, reassembles a Babington Airtronic burner during an expeditionary kitchen training at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Sept. 29, 2015. Harder, among other FSS Airmen, learned how to operate, repair, and maintain the burner during the training. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mya M. Crosby/Released)

A Babington Airtronic burner functions during expeditionary kitchen training at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Sept. 30, 2015. The Airmen that attended the training learned how to break down and reassemble the burner. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mya M. Crosby/Released)

A Babington Airtronic burner functions during expeditionary kitchen training at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Sept. 30, 2015. The Airmen that attended the training learned how to break down and reassemble the burner. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mya M. Crosby/Released)

U.S. Airmen from the 355th Force Support Squadron work on reassembling Babington Airtronic burners at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Sept. 30, 2015. Airmen from D-M, Luke AFB, Ariz., and Nellis AFB, Nev., attended the expeditionary kitchen training. The training was dedicated to FSS Airmen learning how to operate, repair and maintain equipment in a Single Pallet Expeditionary Kitchen. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mya M. Crosby/Released)

U.S. Airmen from the 355th Force Support Squadron work on reassembling Babington Airtronic burners at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Sept. 30, 2015. Airmen from D-M, Luke AFB, Ariz., and Nellis AFB, Nev., attended the expeditionary kitchen training. The training was dedicated to FSS Airmen learning how to operate, repair and maintain equipment in a Single Pallet Expeditionary Kitchen. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mya M. Crosby/Released)

Ramiro Andrade, Babington Technology engineer, lectures on how to properly take apart a Babington Airtronic burner to 355th Force Support Squadron Airmen at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Sept. 30, 2015. Andrade came to D-M to teach the Airmen how to operate, repair and maintain equipment that they would use in a deployed environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mya M. Crosby/Released)

Ramiro Andrade, Babington Technology engineer, lectures on how to properly take apart a Babington Airtronic burner to 355th Force Support Squadron Airmen at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Sept. 30, 2015. Andrade came to D-M to teach the Airmen how to operate, repair and maintain equipment that they would use in a deployed environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mya M. Crosby/Released)

Ramiro Andrade, Babington Technology engineer, teaches Airman 1st Class Collin Knight, 355th Force Support Squadron fitness specialist, and Senior Airman Krystal Jones, 355h FSS guest service specialist, about the Babington Airtronic burner during an expeditionary kitchen training at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Sept. 30, 2015. The Airmen attended the training where they received first-hand knowledge about the burner. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mya M. Crosby/Released)

Ramiro Andrade, Babington Technology engineer, teaches Airman 1st Class Collin Knight, 355th Force Support Squadron fitness specialist, and Senior Airman Krystal Jones, 355h FSS guest service specialist, about the Babington Airtronic burner during an expeditionary kitchen training at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Sept. 30, 2015. The Airmen attended the training where they received first-hand knowledge about the burner. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mya M. Crosby/Released)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Ayala Angulo, 355th Force Support Squadron unit deployment manager, and 2nd Lt. Allante Staten, 355th FSS officer in charge of readiness, fix a Babington Airtronic burner during an expeditionary kitchen training at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Sept. 30, 2015. The training was held at Desert Lighting City, D-M’s training ground that mirrors a deployed location.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mya M. Crosby/Released)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Ayala Angulo, 355th Force Support Squadron unit deployment manager, and 2nd Lt. Allante Staten, 355th FSS officer in charge of readiness, fix a Babington Airtronic burner during an expeditionary kitchen training at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Sept. 30, 2015. The training was held at Desert Lighting City, D-M’s training ground that mirrors a deployed location. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mya M. Crosby/Released)

DAVIS-MONTHAN AIR FORCE BASE, Ariz. -- Thirty Airmen attended expeditionary kitchen training at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base's Desert Lightning City, Sept. 29-30.

The Air Combat Command funded training was hosted by Babington Technology to educate Airmen from D-M, Luke AFB, Arizona, and Nellis AFB, Nevada, on handling equipment in a single pallet expeditionary kitchen.

The Airmen learned how to operate, repair and maintain the Babington Airtronic burner, as well as the Tray Ration heating system. These are all included in the Single Pallet Expeditionary Kitchen. The 355th Force Support Squadron will also be using the same equipment for their phase 2 training in November.

"The training is really beneficial to the Airmen because it sets them up for success," said Staff Sgt. Ayala Angulo, 355th FSS unit deployment manager. "That very kitchen is the only kitchen on D-M that is also our deployable asset, if we did require to be brought to a bare base."

Desert Lightning City is D-M's training ground that simulates a deployed location.  The Airmen had an approximate three -hour lecture and demonstration before they went hands-on with the equipment.

"They'll be able to diagnose any issues they have. When they deploy, they won't have to ask, call or read a manual, they'll have the first-hand knowledge." Angulo said.  "Everyone they're servicing, to include contractors, anyone that's going to be eating on base, benefits from this training as well."