What to know about Fitness Assessments

U.S. Air Force Airmen execute the timed sit up portion of the Air Force fitness assessment at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., July 27, 2015. The FA consists of a body composition assessment, to include height and weight measurements and waist circumference measurements, timed pushups and sit ups and a 1.5 mile run. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mya M. Crosby/Released)

U.S. Air Force Airmen execute the timed sit up portion of the Air Force fitness assessment at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., July 27, 2015. The FA consists of a body composition assessment, to include height and weight measurements and waist circumference measurements, timed pushups and sit ups and a 1.5 mile run. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mya M. Crosby/Released)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Melissa Nater, 355th Force Support Squadron fitness assessment cell NCO in charge, counts an Airmen’s sit ups for a fitness assessment at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., July 30, 2015. During an FA, there are physical training monitors there to help assist Airmen and to make sure that the assessment is being performed correctly. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mya M. Crosby/Released)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Melissa Nater, 355th Force Support Squadron fitness assessment cell NCO in charge, counts an Airmen’s sit ups for a fitness assessment at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., July 30, 2015. During an FA, there are physical training monitors there to help assist Airmen and to make sure that the assessment is being performed correctly. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mya M. Crosby/Released)

U.S. Air Force First Lieutenant Brian Ingham, 42nd Electronic Combat Mission Squadron EC-130H student pilot, performs the 1.5 mile portion of the fitness assessment at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., July 27, 2015. Ingham was first to complete the running portion of this FA. When an Airman scores an absolute 100 percent on the FA, they receive recognition and have their picture displayed in the lobby of the Tech. Sgt. Arthur J. Benko Fitness and Sports Center. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mya M. Crosby/Released)

U.S. Air Force First Lieutenant Brian Ingham, 42nd Electronic Combat Mission Squadron EC-130H student pilot, performs the 1.5 mile portion of the fitness assessment at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., July 27, 2015. Ingham was first to complete the running portion of this FA. When an Airman scores an absolute 100 percent on the FA, they receive recognition and have their picture displayed in the lobby of the Tech. Sgt. Arthur J. Benko Fitness and Sports Center. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mya M. Crosby/Released)

DAVIS-MONTHAN AIR FORCE BASE, Ariz., -- The Air Force's Fitness Assessment is one of the many opportunities for Airmen to display their Core Values. When it comes to this assessment, Airmen here must know what to expect, what to avoid, and how to prepare in order to exceed.

FA sessions are scheduled here Monday through Friday at 5:30 a.m. and 7:30 a.m. at the Tech. Sgt. Arthur J. Benko Fitness and Sports Center. The four components of the FA are the body composition assessment, timed pushups, timed sit ups and a 1.5 mile running portion. The body composition assessment includes height, weight, and abdominal circumference measurements.

"The Unit Fitness Program Managers are responsible for notifying the member when they're up to take their fitness assessment," said Melissa Nater, 355th Force Support Squadron Fitness Assessment Cell NCO in charge. "Ultimately Airmen are responsible for knowing when their fitness assessment is due. They have to sign up themselves unless it's an emergency or they have to deploy and they don't have access to our SharePoint, then they can call us and we can help them schedule."

The sit-up and push-up portions of the FA are conducted in the aerobics room past the women's locker room on the first floor. The running portion is performed at the outdoor track located past the front entrance parking lot and in case of inclement weather, will be at the indoor track located upstairs. The body composition assessment is conducted behind the reception desk of the Benko Fitness Center.

For newly stationed Airmen, a 42-day acclimation period starts from the Airman's report no later than date. The acclimation period allows Airmen to familiarize themselves with the climate.

Airmen are expected to show up on time to their scheduled FA however, arriving 15 minutes prior is suggested by the FA.

"Though Airmen may arrive at the exact time their FA is scheduled to begin, if they arrive a second late, they are considered late and will be turned away," said Nater.
Airmen are required to adhere to physical training uniform standards throughout their assessment.

"We do turn them down if they come in the wrong uniform or wrong colored socks; anything besides black or white with a small logo," said Nater. "There can't be gray socks, purple socks, or even black socks with a lot of design."

When an Airman is turned away due to a uniform violation or physical failure in any of the four components, the Airmen's chain of command is notified and they then have 90 days to retest.

"They can test whenever they think they're ready again" said Nater. "When we have an Airman who failed a component of their FA, we immediately let them know and they have the option to keep going, it looks better on their score if they finish their test rather than just stopping."

If a member receives a score of 100% with no exemptions, the FAC will display the Airman and their achievement on a board every month at the Benko Fitness Center lobby.

Airmen are required to demonstrate integrity first, service before self, and excellence in all we do in every opportunity given by the Air Force. Whether it is testing for promotion or performing fitness assessments, Airmen are expected to carry out each task with outstanding quality.