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U.S. Airmen and civilians from the 355th Comptroller Squadron volunteer at the Food Bank of Southern Arizona, Ariz., in Tucson, July 14, 2016. They participated in a three hour volunteer shift, which involved sorting and boxing different kinds of nonperishable foods. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Nathan H. Barbour/Released) Food for thought
An Air Force base cannot function properly or complete its mission effectively without public trust and support from the local community. The Honorary Commander Program opens the door to good communication by allowing D-M and the Tucson, Arizona community to see how each other operate. “The program is used to connect military organizations with community leaders so they can have an awareness of what our mission is,” said Senior Master Sgt. Lisa Azzoline, 355th Comptroller Squadron superintendent. “That way, they can go back out into the community and advocate for us.”
0 7/20
2016
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Michael McNally, 355th Maintenance Group scheduler, removes the cover from an adhesive strip on a block of C4 plastic explosive during an explosive ordnance disposal immersion course at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., June 28, 2016. McNally has worked in the maintenance support field for the past eight years. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Nathan H. Barbour/Released) Airman participates in EOD immersion
Leaving a career field can be a scary proposition for an Airman who has been performing and learning the ins and outs of their job for the better part of a decade. The new career they choose may or may not be a good fit. Despite that, Staff Sgt. Michael McNally, 355th Maintenance Group scheduler, recently became eligible to retrain into another career field, so he decided to change direction.
0 7/13
2016
U.S. Air Force Brigadier General Steven Bleymaier, commander of Ogden Air Logistics Complex, greets General Ellen Pawlikowski, commander of Air Force Materiel Command, at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., July 12, 2016. The mission of the Air Force Materiel Command is to 
deliver and support agile war-winning capabilities. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mya M. Crosby/Released)
AFMC Commander and Command Chief visit D-M
U.S. Air Force General Ellen Pawlikowski, commander of Air Force Materiel Command, and Chief Master Sgt. Jason France, AFMC command chief, arrive at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., July 12, 2016. Air Force Materiel Command develops, acquires and sustains the aerospace power needed to defend the United States through management, research, acquisition, development, testing and maintenance of existing and future weapons systems and their components. The mission of the Air Force Materiel Command is to deliver and support agile war-winning capabilities. AFMC employs some 80,000 personnel and manages $60 billion annually.
0 7/13
2016
720th Security Forces Squadron members train in triple-digit heat during a drill weekend at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., June 4. They work alongside the 943rd Rescue Group to support active-duty and Air Force Reserve missions. Their parent unit is the 920th Mission Support Group at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Carolyn Herrick) Security forces support active-duty, Reserve missions
When people think of Air Force security forces, their minds often go immediately to flight line operations, military working dogs, and gate guard duty. But there’s a team of Air Force Reserve security forces members here with a totally unique mission: geographically separated from their parent 920th Mission Support Group at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla., the 720th Security Forces Squadron combines traditional reservists and active Guard/Reserve members who support two different entities.
0 7/13
2016
U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. David Beasley, 355th Security Forces Squadron trainer, checks an Airman’s dress and appearance during open ranks at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., July 7th, 2016. Security Forces members are responsible for ensuring the safety of base weapons, property and personnel from hostile forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mya M. Crosby/Released) Security Forces guard mount
The 355th Security Forces Squadron mission is to protect, defend and fight to enable Air Force, joint and coalition mission success. Security Forces members are responsible for ensuring the safety of base weapons, property and personnel from hostile forces. The 355th SFS consists of over 300 military and civilian personnel.
0 7/08
2016
U.S. Airmen Prepare to board a C-23 Sherpa during the Military Freefall Jumpmaster Course at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., June 28, 2016. The course will graduate 12 Airmen at the end of its fifth 3-week-long rotation; reaching a total number of 58 certified jumpmasters. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Nathan H. Barbour/Released) Mastering the jump
In order to run a combat free fall jump and deploy Airmen safely from an aircraft at high altitudes, there has to be someone specially trained to direct the operation. They must be highly proficient in every component of the jump process, from ensuring equipment is donned properly, to coordinating with the aircrew during the release so jumpers land on the designated drop zone. In the past, the only place to receive the formal training required to lead a jump was the Military Freefall School at the U.S. Army Yuma Proving Grounds in Arizona.
0 7/01
2016
U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Ryan Meilleur, 354th Aircraft Maintenance Unit crew chief, washes an A-10C Thunderbolt II on the flightline on Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., June 29, 2016. Crew chiefs clean the A-10s after combat and training sorties to prevent corrosion. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mya M. Crosby/Released) Washing warthogs at D-M
The 354th Aircraft Maintenance Unit’s parent unit, 355th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, generates all combat and training sorties in the 355th Fighter Wing and manages the efforts of 571 personnel in 13 different specialties of maintaining A-10 attack aircraft.
0 6/30
2016
U.S. Air Force Col. Gregory Marzolf, 414th Combat Training Squadron, commander,  Lt. Col. Christopher Cunningham, Detachment 1, 414th CTS, commander and Senior Master Sgt. Stephen Hoss, 414th CTS, Red Flag superintendent, unroll the guidon of Detachment 1 at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., June 24, 2016. The new detachment will be planning, coordinating and executing Angel Thunder 2016. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ashley N. Steffen/ Released)  Preparing the thunder
A new detachment here will aim to boost personnel recovery readiness across the military. Detachment 1 of the 414th Combat Training Squadron, out of Nellis AFB, Nevada, was activated today. The new detachment’s mission is to increase readiness by conducting exercises meant to train personnel recovery forces. Using an application of joint service, multinational, interagency combat search and rescue exercises the team will focus on training personnel recovery though a simulated environment and real world scenarios.
0 6/24
2016
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Andy Bui, 355th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron A-10C Thunderbolt II crew chief, closes a snap panel of an A-10 on the flightline at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., June 23, 2016. The 355th AMXS provides safe and properly configured aircraft in order to meet mission requirements for three squadrons. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mya M. Crosby/Released) Crew chief pre-flight checks
The 355th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron generates all combat and training sorties in the 355th Fighter Wing and manages the efforts of 500 Airmen in 10 specialties maintaining A-10C attack aircraft. The squadron provides safe and properly configured aircraft in order to meet mission requirements for three squadrons. The 355th AMXS also develops and
0 6/23
2016
U.S. Air Force Capt. Keli Kaaekuahiwi, an A-10 pilot assigned to the 354th Fighter Squadron out of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., applies face paint while evading capture during a personnel recovery exercise at a training site in the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex, June 14, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-2. RF-A gives U.S. and partner nation forces an opportunity to sharpen combat skills like search and rescue in a realistic threat environment inside the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex, which at more than 67,000 square miles, is the largest instrumented air, ground and electronic combat training range in the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik/Released) Personnel recovery exercise brings rescue teams together for RF-A 16-2
The phrase, “So Others May Live to Return with Honor” expresses the overarching goal of those serving in the rescue community and it connects a myriad of career fields dedicated to fulfilling that mission. RED FLAG-Alaska 16-2 provided an opportunity to connect survival, evasion, resistance and escape specialists, rescue squadron personnel, combat search and rescue assets, and an A-10 Thunderbolt II pilot during an isolated personnel scenario June 14.
0 6/17
2016
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