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U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. George Mena, 355th Fighter Wing chaplain’s assistant, pours hot chocolate at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Dec. 14, 2015. Mena brought cups of hot chocolate to Airmen at entry control points around D-M. Visits like this are part of the Chaplain’s weekly routine to check on D-M’s Airmen. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Cheyenne A. Powers/ Released)

D-M Chaplain Corps
You see them everywhere, at retirement ceremonies, change of command ceremonies, and even squadron holiday parties. They come visit you at work just to see how you're doing. They might even bring cookies with them. They provide an ear for when you need to vent, and can give advice.The Chaplain Corps provides spiritual care for all who have base
0 12/29
2015
U.S. Air Force Capt. Miguel Valencia, 563rd Operational Support Squadron flight surgeon, shows David Gallaher, 924th Fighter Group honorary commander and managing member and designated broker for Tucson Industrial Realty LLC, how to thread a suture needle at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Dec. 2, 2015.  D-M AFB’s honorary commanders toured the 355th Medical Group with stops that included the Medical Clinic and the Health and Wellness Center. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ashley N. Steffen/Released) Honorary Commander's golden ticket opens gates to D-M AFB
Like Willy Wonka's Chocolate Factory a military installation can be a world of mystery to those outside its gates. The D-M AFB Honorary Commander Program allows local civic and business leaders to gain a better understanding of the various missions and units on base by providing tours and activities. There are approximately 50 honorary commanders
0 12/18
2015
Two 355th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron A-10C Thunderbolt II crew chiefs prepare to cover an A-10 and extract its pilot at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Nov. 4, 2015.  Crew chiefs cover the jet’s intake to prevent foreign object damage to the engines. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ashley N. Steffen/Released) Pride in perfection
The constant strive for perfection, pride in their aircraft, and responsibility of knowing they have someone's life in their hands; these are a few examples of what A-10C Thunderbolt II crew chiefs have resting on their shoulders each day."The never ending pursuit of perfection is what the job demands," said Senior Airman Yevgeniy Sokolov, 355th
0 11/10
2015
U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Henry Crankshaw, 755th Operations Support Squadron NCO in charge of aircrew flight equipment quality assurance, stands in front of a Cessna O-1F Bird Dog at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Oct. 13, 2015. Crankshaw served as a life support investigator for recovery team 3 during a Defense POW MIA (prisoner of war missing in action) Accounting Agency mission from May 12 to June 18, 2014. Crankshaw and his team were assigned to an O-1F aircraft crash site located in the Quang Tri Province of Vietnam. The team was able to identify the pilot of the aircraft and bring him home to the U.S. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Cheyenne A. Powers/ Released) Airman brings home an MIA of 50 years
Not every service member makes it home from U.S. conflicts with other countries. Some of America's servicemen have been missing in action for over 50 years. Yet, even though it's been half a century since some of these conflicts, the U.S. is still doing whatever it takes to bring those who were missing in action home. One Airman from D-M helped do
0 10/14
2015
U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Bruce Davis, 527th Space Aggressor Squadron radio frequency transmission supervisor, shakes hands with Dr. Faiz Anwer, medical oncologist, at Banner-University Medical Center in Tucson, Ariz., July 2015. Anwer was the lead doctor during Davis’ bone marrow collection procedure, which was facilitated by the C.W. Bill Young Department of Defense Marrow Donor Program. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Chris Drzazgowski/Released) Airman provides vitality through marrow donation
One out of 540 members of the C.W. Bill Young Department of Defense Marrow Donor Program ever proceeds to donate marrow or stem cells. An Airman from Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, had the opportunity to be one of those donors.The C.W. Bill Young DoD Marrow Donor Program works exclusively with military personnel and their dependents, as well
0 9/24
2015
U.S. Army Pvt. Tony Gargano, World War II prisoner of war, holds a prayer book at his residence in Tucson, Ariz., Aug. 20, 2015. Gargano carried the little prayer book with him during his time as a POW, tallying each day they marched, in the book, totaling to 30 days. During the march, the POWs had to beg for food, barely surviving off of one meal a day. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ashley N. Steffen/Released) The struggle of an imprisoned warrior
Sweat and water mingled in dripping beads, caressing the cheeks of muddied Soldiers in a land rotting with war.It was early in the morning; the world was still black with a sleeping sun. In anticipation, U.S. Army Pvt. Tony Gargano, in Fox Company, waited to launch a secret attack on the German soldier's front line.Not all were willing to fight,
0 9/17
2015
Malcolm Johnson, World War II veteran and former prisoner of war, tells his story at the Tucson Veterans Center in Tucson, Ariz., Aug. 18, 2015. Johnson was a civilian contractor when he was captured in December 1941. Nearly five years after being captured, Johnson was awarded the Bronze Star Medal with Valor in 1947. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Chris Massey/Released) Malcolm Johnson: Civilian prisoner of war
Ninety-four-year-old Malcolm "Mickey" Johnson sits in his wheelchair wearing a maroon baseball cap with the words "Survivors of Wake Guam-Cavite" written in light blue letters. Johnson's step-son and daughter-in-law sit attentively while he talks about his experience as a civilian prisoner of war.In April of 1941, Johnson was 19 years old when he
0 9/16
2015
Retired U.S. Army 1st Sgt. Ray Frazier reflects on his time as a prisoner of war during the Korean War at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Aug. 28, 2015. Frazier joined the army when he was 16 years old, and had to lie about his age just to get in. After serving for two years as a medical NCO, he was captured in South Korea by Chinese soldiers. He spent 865 days, five hours and 15 minutes as a POW in North Korea. Once liberated, Frazier continued to serve in the Army and retired after 22 years of service. (U.S. Air Force photo illustration by Senior Airman Cheyenne A. Powers/Released) A prisoner's war
It began as a civil war, but would soon become an international affair when the United Nations decided to join and support South Korea against North Korea and its ally, the People's Republic of China. One man found himself caught in the middle of it all.Ray "Doc" Frazier, was a young man living in Tennessee with his grandparents and two siblings
0 9/15
2015
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Yevgeniy Sokolov, 355th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, stands on a treadmill in preparation to start a VO2 max test at the Health and Wellness Center at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Sept. 2, 2015. The VO2 max measures the maximum amount of oxygen the body is able to use during a period of intense exercise depending on the subject’s weight and the strength of their lungs. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ashley N. Steffen/Released) Eating; Back to basics
The smell of baking cheese, sizzling meats, and toasting bread waft into the air. In the oven, a pizza rests with its oils glistening in the kitchen lights, waiting to be devoured.While pizza may make mouths water uncontrollably and stomachs lurch with desire, it also may leave you craving for more food. In fact, many foods leave you feeling full
0 9/14
2015
U.S. Marine Corps Capt. Jonathon Leach, 41st Electronic Combat Squadron mission crew commander stands with U.S. Air Force EC-130H Compass Call crew members on the flightline at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., July 31, 2015. He is part of a three-year inter-service exchange program where he flies with Airmen from the 41st ECS. Leach is from Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N.C. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Cheyenne Morigeau/Released) Jamming the enemy with joint integration
Walking the halls of the 41st Electronic Combat Squadron is an unfamiliar uniform. Leaving the flight deck of the EA-6B Prowler behind for a few years, U.S. Marine Corps Capt. Jonathon Leach from Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, North Carolina, joins the Desert Lightning Team.Leach is part of a three-year inter-service exchange program where
0 7/31
2015
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