D-M Airman helps Tucsonan

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Amanda Boone, 355th Operational Support Squadron weather forecaster, instructs Airman 1st Class Blake Noll, 355th OSS weather forecaster, how to read current radar images at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., March 19, 2015. Both Airmen recently witnessed a car accident in the city of Tucson, Ariz., where Boone administered self-aid buddy care to a victim involved.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Airmen 1st Class Cheyenne Morigeau/Released)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Amanda Boone, 355th Operational Support Squadron weather forecaster, instructs Airman 1st Class Blake Noll, 355th OSS weather forecaster, how to read current radar images at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., March 19, 2015. Both Airmen recently witnessed a car accident in the city of Tucson, Ariz., where Boone administered self-aid buddy care to a victim involved. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airmen 1st Class Cheyenne Morigeau/Released)

DAVIS-MONTHAN AIR FORCE BASE, Ariz. -- One weather forecaster's self-aid buddy care training quickly resurfaced when she witnessed a car accident outside the gates of Davis-Monthan.

Senior Airman Amanda Boone, 355th Operations Support Squadron weather forecaster, was escorting a fellow Airman after undergoing a surgery, when the accident occurred.

"We were sitting at the intersection of Speedway and Kolb," said Boone. "We heard a bang and saw a Volkswagen bug stop in front of us and a Cadillac veer across the intersection and hit a tree."

Boone immediately rushed to the accident scene to assess the situation while Airman 1st Class Blake Noll, 355th OSS weather forecaster, dialed 911.

A Volkswagen had collided with a Cadillac sending it across the intersection. Boone moved her car to shield the Volkswagen from the flow of traffic and then went to check on the elderly woman in the Cadillac.

Knowing the woman could have a severe neck or back injury, Boone called on her previous training as a certified nursing assistant and her SABC training from the Air Force.

"I knew someone would have to get in the back seat to secure her neck and calm her down," Boone said. "I moved to the back seat and explained who I was and what I was doing."

Once paramedics arrived on scene, they assumed control of the situation.

Boone attributes her immediate response to instinct.

"It wasn't a big deal for me," Boone said. "It's something everyone, especially an Airman, should do when given the opportunity."

Noll, who just had his surgery, wished he could have done more to help.

"When you're sitting in (SABC) class you think 'Man, I wish this class was over,' but when something like this happens and you put your training to use, it makes it worthwhile," Noll said. "I just wish I was able to react as impulsively as she did."

Boone encourages anyone who comes across a situation in which they can help save another life to not give it a second thought, but just do it.