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68th RQS conducts jump training

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A U.S. Air Force pararescueman from the 68th Rescue Squadron waits for a jumpmaster personnel inspection at the Marana Regional Airport in Marana, Ariz., Oct. 5, 2017. The JMPI ensures equipment is correctly rigged before a jump. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Ashley N. Steffen)

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A U.S. Air Force pararescueman from the 68th Rescue Squadron parachutes with a medical rucksack during jump training at the Marana Regional Airport in Marana, Ariz., Oct. 6, 2017. The medical ruck is used to provide treatment to isolated personnel. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Ashley N. Steffen)

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A U.S. Air Force pararescueman from the 68th Rescue Squadron waits for a jumpmaster personnel inspection at the Marana Regional Airport in Marana, Ariz., Oct. 5, 2017. The JMPI ensures equipment is correctly rigged before a jump. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Ashley N. Steffen)

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A U.S. Air Force pararescue instructor from the 68th Rescue Squadron communicates with pararescuemen before a jump over Marana Regional Airport in Marana, Ariz., Oct. 6, 2017. The 68th RQS is the formal Guardian Angel training unit and is responsible for upgrade training of pararescuemen to produce competent team members for units across the Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Ashley N. Steffen)

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A jump instructor with the 68th Rescue Squadron jumps out of a C-23 Sherpa above the Marana Regional Airport in Marana, Ariz., Oct. 5, 2017. The 68th RQS provides pararescuemen and combat rescue officers 5 and 7-level upgrade training in land warfare and personnel recovery. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Ashley N. Steffen)

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U.S. Air Force pararescuemen from the 68th Rescue Squadron parachute into the drop zone at the Marana Regional Airport in Marana, Ariz., Oct. 6, 2017. Pararescuemen use jumping as a primary way to recover isolated personnel and provide treatment in a timely manner. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Ashley N. Steffen)

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A U.S. Air Force pararescueman from the 68th Rescue Squadron parachutes into the drop zone at the Marana Regional Airport in Marana, Ariz., Oct. 6, 2017. The drop zone is a generalized location for the pararescuemen to land after a jump. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Ashley N. Steffen)

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U.S. Air Force pararescuemen from the 68th Rescue Squadron walk to a C-23 Sherpa for a jump at the Marana Regional Airport in Marana, Ariz., Oct. 5, 2017. The 68th RQS is the formal Guardian Angel training unit and is responsible for upgrade training of pararescuemen to produce competent team members for units across the Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Ashley N. Steffen)

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A U.S. Air Force pararescueman from the 68th Rescue Squadron prepares to load into a C-23 Sherpa for a jump at the Marana Regional Airport in Marana, Ariz., Oct. 5, 2017. The 68th RQS is the formal Guardian Angel training unit and is responsible for upgrade training of pararescuemen to produce competent team members for units across the Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Ashley N. Steffen)

MARANA, Ariz. --

The 68th Rescue Squadron held jump upgrade training at the Marana Regional Airport in Marana, Ariz., this week.

Jump phase is important to get pararescuemen comfortable and competent on a canopy enabling them to land in a given drop zone with precision.

“Jumping is one of the more difficult things we do and the more that we can practice our canopy work the better we will be in high stress situations,” said SSgt Derek, 68th RQS pararescue instructor. “This course helps students get to a point where they can go to a team and continue to progress as a group.”

It is imperative that training, qualifications and capabilities of pararescuemen are extensive because they are the only Department of Defense forces specifically postured to conduct full spectrum personnel recovery.

“This is a main way for us to get to injured personnel or isolated personnel in a timely manner and provide treatment in the quickest time possible,” Said TSgt Dustin, 68th RQS pararescue instructor.

The jump training spans over several weeks and is in conducted in multiple regions across the U.S.