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DM’s Dragons bring thunder to Green Flag 17-01

An Airman assigned to 355th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., prepares an A-10 Thunderbolt II to participate in Green Flag 17-01 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Oct. 4, 2016. During exercise execution, Green Flag staff direct, monitor and instruct visiting units in the conduct of air operations in support of ground forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kevin Tanenbaum/Released)

An Airman assigned to 355th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., prepares an A-10 Thunderbolt II to participate in Green Flag 17-01 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Oct. 4, 2016. During exercise execution, Green Flag staff direct, monitor and instruct visiting units in the conduct of air operations in support of ground forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kevin Tanenbaum/Released)

Senior Airman Scott Martinez, 355th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., climbs down the side of an A-10 Thunderbolt II before takeoff at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Oct. 4, 2016. The A-10 has excellent maneuverability at low air speeds and altitude, and is a highly accurate and survivable weapons-delivery platform. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kevin Tanenbaum/Released)

Senior Airman Scott Martinez, 355th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., climbs down the side of an A-10 Thunderbolt II before takeoff at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Oct. 4, 2016. The A-10 has excellent maneuverability at low air speeds and altitude, and is a highly accurate and survivable weapons-delivery platform. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kevin Tanenbaum/Released)

An A-10 Thunderbolt II pilot assigned to 357th Fighter Squadron, Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., prepares to takeoff and participate in Green Flag 17-01 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Oct. 4, 2016. On average, all four U.S. military services, including guard and reserve components, participate in Green Flag exercises each year. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kevin Tanenbaum/Released)

An A-10 Thunderbolt II pilot assigned to 357th Fighter Squadron, Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., prepares to takeoff and participate in Green Flag 17-01 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Oct. 4, 2016. On average, all four U.S. military services, including guard and reserve components, participate in Green Flag exercises each year. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kevin Tanenbaum/Released)

An A-10 Thunderbolt II assigned to 357th Fighter Squadron, Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., sits on the flightline before participating in Green Flag 17-01 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Oct. 4, 2016. Green Flag is a close air support and joint integration exercise administered by the U.S. Air Force Air Warfare Center at Nellis AFB through the 549th Combat Training Squadron. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kevin Tanenbaum/Released)

An A-10 Thunderbolt II assigned to 357th Fighter Squadron, Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., sits on the flightline before participating in Green Flag 17-01 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Oct. 4, 2016. Green Flag is a close air support and joint integration exercise administered by the U.S. Air Force Air Warfare Center at Nellis AFB through the 549th Combat Training Squadron. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kevin Tanenbaum/Released)

Senior Airman Scott Martinez, 355th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., signals to an A-10 Thunderbolt II pilot during takeoff at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Oct. 4, 2016. The wide combat radius and short takeoff and landing capability of the A-10 permit operations in and out of locations near front lines. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kevin Tanenbaum/Released)

Senior Airman Scott Martinez, 355th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., signals to an A-10 Thunderbolt II pilot during takeoff at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Oct. 4, 2016. The wide combat radius and short takeoff and landing capability of the A-10 permit operations in and out of locations near front lines. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kevin Tanenbaum/Released)

Senior Airman Scott Martinez, 355th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., performs pre-flight checks to make sure the tail rudders of an A-10 Thunderbolt operate properly before takeoff at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Oct. 4, 2016. The Thunderbolt II can employ a wide variety of conventional munitions, including general purpose bombs, cluster bomb units, laser guided bombs, and joint direct attack munitions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kevin Tanenbaum/Released)

Senior Airman Scott Martinez, 355th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., performs pre-flight checks to make sure the tail rudders of an A-10 Thunderbolt operate properly before takeoff at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Oct. 4, 2016. The Thunderbolt II can employ a wide variety of conventional munitions, including general purpose bombs, cluster bomb units, laser guided bombs, and joint direct attack munitions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kevin Tanenbaum/Released)

Senior Airman Scott Martinez, 355th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., prepares an A-10 Thunderbolt II for takeoff at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Oct. 4, 2016. The Thunderbolt II has Night Vision Imaging Systems, or NVIS, goggle compatible single-seat cockpits forward of their wings and a large bubble canopy which provides pilots all-around vision. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kevin Tanenbaum/Released)

Senior Airman Scott Martinez, 355th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., prepares an A-10 Thunderbolt II for takeoff at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Oct. 4, 2016. The Thunderbolt II has Night Vision Imaging Systems, or NVIS, goggle compatible single-seat cockpits forward of their wings and a large bubble canopy which provides pilots all-around vision. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kevin Tanenbaum/Released)

Senior Airman Scott Martinez, 355th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., signals to an A-10 Thunderbolt II as the pilot taxis down the runway at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Oct. 4, 2016. The 357th Fighter Squadron is participating in a realistic air-land integration combat training exercise involving air forces of the U. S. and its allies. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kevin Tanenbaum/Released)

Senior Airman Scott Martinez, 355th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., signals to an A-10 Thunderbolt II as the pilot taxis down the runway at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Oct. 4, 2016. The 357th Fighter Squadron is participating in a realistic air-land integration combat training exercise involving air forces of the U. S. and its allies. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kevin Tanenbaum/Released)

Two A-10 Thunderbolt II assigned to 357th Fighter Squadron, Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., wait to takeoff at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Oct. 4, 2016. The A-10 can loiter near battle areas for extended periods of time and operate in low ceiling and visibility conditions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kevin Tanenbaum/Released)

Two A-10 Thunderbolt II assigned to 357th Fighter Squadron, Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., wait to takeoff at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Oct. 4, 2016. The A-10 can loiter near battle areas for extended periods of time and operate in low ceiling and visibility conditions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kevin Tanenbaum/Released)

An A-10 Thunderbolt II assigned to 357th Fighter Squadron, Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., prepares to participate in Green Flag 17-01 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Oct. 4, 2016. Green Flag exercises provide critical training for approximately 75,000 joint forces and coalition personnel per year, including 3,000 sorties, 6,000 flight hours, and the expenditure of over 700,000 pounds of live and training ordnance on the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, Calif. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kevin Tanenbaum/Released)
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An A-10 Thunderbolt II assigned to 357th Fighter Squadron, Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., prepares to participate in Green Flag 17-01 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Oct. 4, 2016. Green Flag exercises provide critical training for approximately 75,000 joint forces and coalition personnel per year, including 3,000 sorties, 6,000 flight hours, and the expenditure of over 700,000 pounds of live and training ordnance on the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, Calif. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kevin Tanenbaum/Released)

NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE, Nev.- --

Green Flag exercises provide critical training for approximately 75,000 joint forces and coalition personnel per year, including 3,000 sorties, 6,000 flight hours, and the expenditure of over 700,000 pounds of live and training ordnance on the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, Calif.

During exercise execution, Green Flag staff direct, monitor and instruct visiting units in the conduct of air operations in support of ground forces.

The A-10 has excellent maneuverability at low air speeds and altitude, and is a highly accurate and survivable weapons-delivery platform.

The Thunderbolt II has Night Vision Imaging Systems, or NVIS, goggle compatible single-seat cockpits forward of their wings and a large bubble canopy which provides pilots all-around vision.