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U.S. Navy retired Senior Chief Petty Officer Allen Estes, D-M’s Retiree Activities Office manager, and his wife Barbara Estes, D-M’s RAO editor and receptionist, pose for a portrait at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, November 9, 2016. Alan and Barbara volunteer their time to provide services and information to retired service members in Tucson’s local area. (U.S. Air Force photo illustration by Airman Nathan H. Barbour) For retirees, by retirees
For some, serving 20 years in the military may be just the right amount of time necessary to achieve retirement and move on. Retired Senior Chief Petty Officer Allen Estes, D-M’s Retiree Activities Office manager, served his time in the U.S. Navy, but has decided that he still has more to give back to his military family. “I had a good time in my Navy career,” Allen said. “I have time and I just feel like I should give back.” Allen and his wife Barbara Estes, D-M’s RAO editor and receptionist, volunteer their time to ensure the information area of the RAO is staffed.
0 11/10
2016
U.S. Air Force retired Chief Master Sgt. Garland “Bill” Love poses in front of memorabilia at the Retiree Activities Office at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Nov. 7, 2016. Love served 32 years in the Air Force, 16 years in the civil services and is now on his 13th year of service at D-M’s Retiree Activities Office on base. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mya M. Crosby) Chief Love: the veteran that keeps serving
Veterans Day is commemorated to honor those who have served in the United States Armed Services. Despite retiring from the Air Force 32 years ago as a medical technician, and serving an additional 16 years of civil service, retired Chief Master Sgt. Garland “Bill” Love continues to devote his time to his country. Love, from West Monroe, Louisiana, joined the Air Force after his half-brother died during World War II. His decision to suit up was a no-brainer.
0 11/10
2016
Staff Sgt. Vincent Cruz, 355th Maintenance Group Air Force repair enhancement technician, solders a replacement relay for an armament relay box that controls some of the A-10 weapons systems at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Oct. 25, 2016. D-M’s AFREP possesses a repair rate of 95 percent and a financial benefit of over two million dollars. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mya M. Crosby) AFREP cuts costs with in-house repairs
The Air Force has tens of thousands of pieces of equipment in its inventory. Coming across broken components is inevitable. The AF Repair Enhancement Program specializes in the repair of broken equipment for future reutilization.
0 11/02
2016
U.S. Air Force 2nd Lt. Caroline Rodriguez, 355th Comptroller Squadron financial services officer, poses for a portrait at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Oct. 18, 2016. Rodriguez transitioned from enlisted member to officer after completing Air Force Officer Training School this past March. (U.S. Air Force photo illustration by Airman Nathan H. Barbour) From NCO to CGO
Around this time in 2015, Caroline Rodriguez was serving in the rank of technical sergeant in the U.S. Air Force. She still serves today, but in a slightly altered uniform and has assumed much more responsibility. Rodriguez transitioned from enlisted member to officer after completing Air Force Officer Training School this past March.
0 10/21
2016
Davis-Monthan Air Force Base's Retiree Activities Office is located at 3500 S. Craycroft Rd., east of the base chapel, and is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. The RAO was established by the Secretary of the Air Force to serve military retirees, spouses, widows and widowers, and to support, advance and unify retired and active duty military families. (U.S. Air Force photo Airman 1st Class Mya M. Crosby) Retirees advance AF family at D-M
The Retired Activities Office was established to serve military retirees, spouses, widows and widowers, and to support, advance and unify retired and active duty military families. The RAO’s services range from retiree orientations, military widow and widower services, to Volunteer Income Tax Assistance. The office also offers assistance with military entitlements, former spouse benefits and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.
0 10/18
2016
A student assigned to the 372nd Training Squadron, Detachment 11, Miniature and Microminiature (2M) Circuit Card Repair course solders a circuit card at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Oct. 3, 2016. The 2M program is a part of the U.S. Navy program, but can be applied to multiple airframes in the U.S. Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Betty R. Chevalier) Training detachment expands maintainers' knowledge AF-wide
From the outside, it’s a barren building with no windows and few travelers through the doors, but down its concrete halls, Airmen from all over the world are expanding their knowledge on aircraft maintenance.
0 10/06
2016
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Macy Benjamin, 355th Contracting Squadron contract administrator, prepares to perform a dead lift at the Haeffner Fitness and Sports Center at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Aug. 25, 2016. Benjamin uses weightlifting as a personal escape from everyday stressors. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ashley N. Steffen) Worth the weight
With her brow furrowed and teeth gritting as every muscle in her body tenses up, the dissonant sounds of metallic ringing, determined grunting, and echoed overhead music, constructs this 25-year-old bodybuilder’s place of serenity. Staff Sgt. Macy Benjamin finds her escape from everyday life within her workouts. Starting with a scarce amount of fitness knowledge, she began transforming herself from an average Airman to a fitness guru.
0 8/29
2016
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Kimo Lagapa-Talbott, 355th Operations Support Squadron air traffic controller, communicates with pilots via radio at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., July 29, 2016. Lagapa-Talbott received the 2015 Air Force Air Traffic Controller of the Year award. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mya M. Crosby) Airman cleared to land AF-level award
Air traffic controllers have one of the most demanding and stressful jobs in the Air Force. With no room for error, they must be calm, decisive and quick thinking in order to be effective. Senior Airman Kimo Lagapa-Talbott, 355th Operations Support Squadron air traffic controller, recently received the 2015 AF Air Traffic Controller of the Year award.
0 8/09
2016
An HC-130 from Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona, sits idly on the Nellis flightline before preparing to take-off for a training sortie during Red Flag 16-3 July 13. With the HC-130 providing transport to the 79th Rescue Squadron during the exercise, the aircraft is able to deliver the RQS airman to the destination during the exercises while also being able to perform supply drops into the field. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jake Carter) 79th RQS hones skills during Red Flag 16-3
For a pararescue Airmen, there is one simple creed that they live by, ‘That others may live’. Whether those “others” are down range or are on American soil in a training environment, the 79th Rescue Squadron, from Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona came to Nellis to participate in Red Flag 16-3 so they can uphold that creed.
0 7/18
2016
U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Anthony Webb, 612th Air Communications Squadron command and control systems technician, reads from an online chat room while streaming a video game at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., April 27, 2016. Streaming helped Webb become more social prior to joining the Air Force. He is now set on building a community by streaming five days a week and holds sessions on Sundays specifically to interact with his followers and receive feedback. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Nathan H. Barbour/Released) Airman finds his voice in a virtual world
There is a social stigma attached to video games and the people who play them. When picturing a gamer; a well-lit room, socialization, and a strong sense of community, generally doesn’t come to mind.U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Anthony Webb, isn’t your typical gamer. His dorm room is set up as a small studio, complete with a green screen,
0 5/03
2016
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