Simulated Crash Site Training

An Airman guides a helicopter onto a truck.

A U.S. Air Force Airman helps guide the wheel on an HH-60G Pave Hawk II onto a transport truck at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona, June 26, 2020. The Crash, Damaged and Disabled Aircraft Recovery team ensures the urgent movement of any aircraft from areas that interfere with the installation’s flying operations to sustain a clear and active runway. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sari A. Seibert)

An Airman guides a helicopter onto a truck.

U.S. Air Force Airmen help guide an a HH-60G Pave Hawk II off a truck to be used for a simulated crash recovery exercise at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona, June 26, 2020. The Crash, Damaged and Disabled Aircraft Recovery team ensures the urgent movement of any aircraft from areas that interfere with the installation’s flying operations to sustain a clear and active runway. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sari A. Seibert)

An Airman guides a helicopter onto the ground.

U.S. Air Force Airmen help lower an HH-60G Pave Hawk II off a truck to be used for a simulated crash recovery exercise at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona, June 26, 2020. The Crash, Damaged and Disabled Aircraft Recovery team conducted a simulated helicopter crash scenario and crane lift. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sari A. Seibert)

An Airman stands on a helicopter.

A U.S. Air Force Airman stands on top of an HH-60G Pave Hawk II to help get it off a crane at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona, June 26, 2020. The Crash, Damaged and Disabled Aircraft Recovery team conducted a simulated helicopter crash scenario and crane lift. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sari A. Seibert)

An Airman sits in a briefing.

U.S. Air Force Airmen get briefed on a training exercise at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona, June 26, 2020. The Crash, Damaged and Disabled Aircraft Recovery team provides in-flight and ground emergency rapid response capability for all aircraft, local and transient. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sari A. Seibert)

Airmen carry parts.

U.S. Air Force Airmen carry an a HH-60G Pave Hawk II pilot’s seat in a simulated crash recovery site at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona, June 26, 2020. The Crash, Damaged and Disabled Aircraft Recovery team provides in-flight and ground emergency rapid response capability for all aircraft, local and transient. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sari A. Seibert)

Airmen stand on a helicopter.

U.S. Air Force Airmen prepare an HH-60G Pave Hawk II to be lifted from a simulated crash site at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona, June 26, 2020. The Crash, Damaged and Disabled Aircraft Recovery team conducts aircraft recovery operations during aircraft emergency mishaps. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sari A. Seibert)

Airmen prepare a helicopter.

U.S. Air Force Airmen prepare a helicopter to be lifted from a simulated crash site at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona, June 26, 2020. The Crash, Damaged and Disabled Aircraft Recovery team conducts aircraft recovery operations during aircraft emergency mishaps. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sari A. Seibert)

An Airman guides a helicopter onto the ground.

U.S. Air Force Airmen help lift an HH-60G Pave Hawk II from a simulated crash site at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona, June 26, 2020. The Crash, Damaged and Disabled Aircraft Recovery team conducts aircraft recovery operations during emergency aircraft mishaps. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sari A. Seibert)

Airman hold a rope.
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U.S. Air Force Airmen use a rope to guide an HH-60G Pave Hawk II onto a truck at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona, June 26, 2020. The Crash, Damaged and Disabled Aircraft Recovery team is comprised of aircraft subject matter experts that are trained to safely and expeditiously recover crashed, damaged or disabled aircraft while minimizing secondary airframe damage. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sari A. Seibert)

Airman guide a helicopter on a truck.
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U.S. Air Force Airmen help lift an HH-60G Pave Hawk II onto a truck at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona, June 26, 2020. The Crash, Damaged and Disabled Aircraft Recovery team is comprised of aircraft subject matter experts that are trained to safely and expeditiously recover crashed, damaged or disabled aircraft while minimizing secondary airframe damage. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sari A. Seibert)

An Airman holds a rope.
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A U.S. Air Force Airman helps lift an HH-60G Pave Hawk II onto a truck at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona, June 26, 2020. The Crash, Damaged and Disabled Aircraft Recovery team provides in-flight and ground emergency rapid response capability for all aircraft, local and transient. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sari A. Seibert)

DAVIS-MONTHAN AIR FORCE BASE, Ariz. --

The 355th Wing Crash, Damaged and Disabled Aircraft Recovery Team conducted aircraft recovery training at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, June 26, 2020.

This training provided valuable and realistic emergency mishap response training, as well as allowing for an actual aircraft recovery and lift opportunity.

“We are conducting a simulated HH-60[G Pave Hawk II] helicopter crash scenario and crane lift,” said U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Flavio Baca, 355th Wing CDDAR program manager. “We desired a more in-depth and hands-on training scenario for our CDDAR team. The 48th Rescue Squadron had a training helicopter and we realized that it would be a great platform to conduct our training.”

The CDDAR Team is leading the way when it comes to innovative ideas to improve training and increase efficiency in the unit. With real life simulated crash sites, Airmen are able to understand and visualize how they help accomplish the mission.

“I am extremely proud of the team,” said Col. Barton Kenerson, 355th Maintenance Group commander. “The training that the CDDAR team is doing helps Airmen advance their skills to be able to address the most complex challenges faced when an aircraft crashes. This team is ready for the fight based of this realistic training that they’re accomplishing.”

This specialized training will allow the team to better support the Air Force’s flying mission whether here at Davis-Monthan or in a deployed environment through training in a more realistic aircraft recovery scenario and enhancing their response capability.